Sony Looking for Security Professionals to Lockdown PlayStation Products

February 23, 2011 Written by Mike Hartnett

The last month has been nothing short of a daytime drama for Sony, after the PlayStation 3’s security suffered a massive security breach, it was thought that the company’s run in this generation’s console race was all but finished. But then, Sony fired back with new TOS agreements and firmware to match. The company is now sending out a clear message that they are willing to do whatever is necessary to secure their consoles.

Sony is currently on the hunt for new security professionals to help secure the ever-growing line of PlayStation products along with the PlayStation Network itself. A current job listing states:

“The program to be developed will require a strong strategic online component (taking input from and working with SCEA Marketing, SCEA Strategic Business Development Latin America and SCEA Product Development), collaborating with other anti-piracy organizations, including those of affiliated Sony Computer Entertainment companies, Sony Corporation and the videogame industry’s trade association, the Entertainment Software Association.”

But it doesn’t end there, it appears that Sony is going for the best of the best, and meanest of the mean, in that individuals chosen for these positions will also be tasked with the job of hunting down PSN offenders through IP addresses and other identifying factors. The company is going for the throat this time, and they’re not kidding around with the last portion of the listing, which states that prospective hires will also be tasked with the following:

“overseeing anti-piracy civil lawsuits and providing support to law enforcement and intellectual property agencies on behalf of SCEA.”

“knowledge of online investigative practices and online databases (e.g. how to find owner, administrator, ISP associated with a given domain name, etc.)”

It’s unknown whether or not this monumental effort will prove effective, as hackers and software engineers are notoriously resilient, and many argue that it’s only a matter of time when it comes to console hacking, such was the case with the PS3.

We’ll be sure to keep you posted if we hear anything further regarding Sony’s digital copyright enforcement program. Until next time, keep it tuned to PlayStation LifeStyle.