Listen to the Beyond Good and Evil 2 Songs Made by HitRECord Contributors

November 8, 2018Written by Janet Garcia

Beyond Good and Evil 2 HitRecord

Earlier in 2018, Ubisoft announced the company would be collaborating with HitRECord to get more original music and visual assets for Beyond Good and Evil 2. We now have the first two tracks Ubisoft has accepted from the HitRECord community: “40 Lashes” and “Cheeky Little Monkey.”

Watch the team discuss the partnership, while comparing and contrasting these new songs, during the recent livestream.

“40 Lashes” has a somber rhythm reminiscent of a slave song, and “Cheeky Little Monkeys” has playful percussion throughout. Both songs will appear when players listen to an in-game radio. Any tracks that ultimately come from the HitRECord community will receive feedback directly from the team at Ubisoft, so the work isn’t merely outsourced.

At the time of writing, there have been over 11,000 contributions made to the game, although it’s unclear how many will make it into the final product. In the case of Beyond Good and Evil 2, sometimes thirty people contribute to a single song.

All contributions are tracked via the resources section within a project. After these resources are sorted through, those whose work ends up in the final product will be listed on the profit proposal for the piece. From there, the community has two weeks to address any issues they have with the profit proposal: from someone being unfairly left out to arguing someone is getting paid too much or too little for their contributions. All of this is posted publicly, and the first round of profit proposals are expected to be listed January 2019.

Ubisoft’s involvement with HitRECord has been met with backlash, with fans accusing the company of “spec work,” i.e work submitted to prospective clients with the hope that they’ll be paid for it. Following these accusations, Gordon-Levitt responded to these criticisms and emphasized that this platform isn’t a contest or an exploitation of creators, but rather a way to collaborate and, potentially, make money doing it.

[Source: Kotaku UK]