PSLS Help Desk – How to Control Trico in The Last Guardian

January 19, 2017Written by Chandler Wood

Help Desk

Anybody with a pet knows that getting them to do exactly what you want to do is a thankless chore. They’ve got minds of their own, and no matter how much you point, shout, or make silly noises at them, they just won’t go put your dead DualShock 4 on the charger and bring you a fresh one. The minds behind The Last Guardian made Trico’s AI much like a pet; frustrating at times, but endearing and adorable at the end of the day. This week’s PSLS Help Desk is taking a software direction and giving you some assistance in the latest PS4 exclusive. Whether you’ve already played it and want to go through it again, or have yet to even pick it up, we’re here to help you get the most out of your journey with Trico in The Last Guardian.

Trico has a mind of its own, and the game doesn’t exactly do a great job of telling you how to get Trico to do what you want. It’s not a complaint, as part of the charming nature of the game is discovering your bond with the creature, but if you want a nudge in the right direction here are some tips on how to control Trico and have him help you solve the various puzzles.

First it should be noted that you cannot control Trico at all early in the game. Eventually there is a voiceover that will give an indication that the boy has formed a bond with Trico and can issue commands. At this point, the game will tell you the basics of controlling Trico, but there is a lot more information to be surmised from hidden clues that the game doesn’t implicitly state.

Sights and Sounds

Trico’s eyes are central to discerning his mood. If they are whitish-blue, it means that he’s entranced by something. You’ll notice this when feeding him barrels throughout the game. Other times this happens are when Trico is mesmerized by the glowing blue pots. If his eyes are pink, he’s enraged or scared. This happens when fighting enemies or when he comes face to face with the stained glass eyes. Often in this state you will need to calm Trico down but climbing onto him and holding circle to pet him. This will help alleviate his fear and rage and bring his eyes back to the standard black color that means you can issue commands.

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Now just because you can issue commands doesn’t mean he’ll listen. You may have to tell Trico to do something a couple of times, but be patient with the chimera. More often than not he just needs to finish sniffing around a bit before moving on to the next area. Pay attention to Trico’s sounds. If you’re stuck and don’t know how to progress, you’ll often find Trico making noises that means the boy just needs to climb on Trico’s back and let him leap to the next platform.

The R1 Button

The R1 button — in combination with other face buttons — is used for commanding the Trico. To call Trico to your location, just tap R1. Depending on how far away he is, the boy will either call him gently, or shout to get his attention. Again, this may take a moment, but Trico will eventually come.

R1 plus the left thumbstick points where you want Trico to go. It can be hit or miss, especially if you are riding on Trico when you try to point. Sometimes Trico would entirely turn around and go the opposite way. Often I found this less helpful than just going to where I wanted Trico to be and pressing R1 to call him, instead of directing him there. Once he’s in position, you can issue additional commands depending on what you need him to do.

The two other useful buttons to use with R1 are triangle and square. Triangle tells Trico to jump, so if you need to ride him up to the next platform, jump on his back and hold R1 and triangle to tell Trico to leap up, or even put his front claws on a wall to get you to a higher ledge. Square tells Trico to attack or swipe with his talons. This is needed a couple of times to break through blocked doorways. Cross and circle apparently scold and praise Trico respectively, but I never found these necessary at any point during my playthrough except to psychologically make myself feel good about praising Trico when he does good, or scolding him when he doesn’t listen to me.

Trico can be a frustrating ally, but The Last Guardian wouldn’t have the heart and charm it does without Trico’s independent AI that really makes the beast feel like a pet we know and love. The most crucial tip for controlling Trico is patience. Enjoy the sights, sounds, and company of the creature. Once you learn patience, Trico will seem a better companion for it, even if it does go against a gamer’s nature of being able to control things in games.

Have you had any trouble controlling Trico? Do you have any other tips that may help players through the game? Try to keep things as spoiler free as possible in the comments below.

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