Trophy Theory: Crazy Things We’ve Done For Trophies

April 12, 2017 Written by Chandler Wood

Addiction can have a crazy effect on people. When most think of addiction, they often think of things with negative outcomes such as drugs or alcohol, but try to picture habits and routines that you just can’t break. Are you the type to have a coffee every morning? What about that mobile game that you don’t tell anyone about, but you still log into and play every single day? Compulsively go for trophies in all of your PlayStation games, even if the game isn’t all that great? Perhaps a less abrasive word might be habit, seeing as having a trophy habit makes you sound much more in control than a trophy addiction, which might make you come across as some crazed video game playing lunatic fiending for the next ding.

Long story short, I have this “habit” of going for trophies, even the insane ones that not only require me to pull off crazy things in games, but to alter or do something in my real life in order to achieve them, and I know I’m not alone in this. We’ve been asking for your submissions and we’ve talked to the rest of the PlayStation LifeStyle staff to bring your real stories of crazy real life things people have done for trophies.

In one of my favorite games, Destiny, one trophy aptly named Flawless Raider requires you to complete a raid flawlessly. This means that no one in the fireteam can die for the full duration of the raid. While this was made easier as the level cap increased and cheeses were found for the raids, getting together a six man group of skilled enough players was a tough task. If even one person dies, it’s back to orbit to restart the raid. Our attempts at this on the Vault of Glass raid even caused one person to rage quit the game when he missed a jump, and we didn’t see him back online for months. My group finally completed it with five people total on Crota’s End without a single one of us succumbing to the darkness. Of course, many people since have shown their talents by completing the raid flawlessly solo, so maybe it wasn’t all that difficult after all, but for a trophy where one screw up can mean hours of lost time? It’s still a tough sell.

Daily Grind

In Rayman Legends, the Truly Awesome! trophy requires players to reach the final level of awesomeness. To accomplish this monumental task, you need to complete medals in online challenges with increasing point values awarded for each medal value. First, this means that you are in competition with other players to stay in the higher medal brackets each day/week. Second, this means that skill is required, but online challenge farmers are pushing down the average medal by taking all of the top spots. On average, this trophy takes about three to six straight months of completing daily challenges if you are getting silvers most of the time, so I made it a daily chore.

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Every day I would work about 20 minutes of Rayman Legends into my day to complete the daily challenges, slowly chipping away at that awesomeness level until I finally got it to pop up nine months after I first started the game (and probably about four months of doing the challenges almost every single day). Some days I did better, some days I did worse, but I always made sure to play them.

Twisted Metal for PS3 had a similar trophy called All Sales Are Final, where you had to win an online match every day for 30 days straight. Miss one day, and it’s back to the beginning. I never ended up getting the Platinum on Twisted Metal, but to this day that trophy is still the rarest out of the 12,104 trophies I have.

Reader Stories

Chris (PSN: RemingtonInk) had a bunch of stories for us because he’s a crazy trophy addicted madman, so let’s run through the things he’s done for trophies. Mortal Kombat (2011)’s My Kung Fu is Stronger required 24 hours of playtime with every character. All 29 of them. Yeah. That’s 30 days of Mortal Kombat playtime. It’s possible to build two characters at once while leaving your PS3 on in training, which is exactly what Chris did for about 14 straight days to get this trophy.

The rest of his stories come at the expense of his being a completionist. He tortured himself getting the ridiculously tough WipEout HD platinum despite not liking racing games. He bought all of the DLC for Burnout Paradise after getting the game for free just to have a 100% list. And he got the Platinum on Hannah Montana The Movie, which doesn’t need much explanation, because even playing that game is a crazy thing he did in real life.

The PS4 Joker

Enzo regales us with a tale about how he created an electronic LEGO engine that pressed a button repeatedly, along with a complex amount of level up calculations in Excel, having a friend help him reach a 15x multiplier, and leaving his PS4 on for a week or two while he reached level 100 in Injustice. Yup, another fighting game that requires absurd amounts of playtime in order to achieve the Platinum trophies, and if it requires a time commitment, you can bet trophy hunters will find some way to cheese or circumvent it, even if it means they can’t play their own PS4 during this time.

Andy went for a glitched trophy in Color Zen based entirely on a theory that you had to beat all 460 levels without turning it off, so he spent three days doing this and… you guessed it, didn’t end up getting the trophy. This is perhaps the harshest of every story, because while the others end with that beautiful ding, Andy’s ends up being three wasted days that he could have been playing or doing literally anything else.

PSLS Staff Trophy Stories

Finally, the gallery below contains some of the trophy stories from the rest of the PlayStation LifeStyle staff. While they may not all be hardcore trophy hunters, they’ve all felt a bit of that trophy hunting bug.

Do you have any crazy trophy stories of your own? What have you done in real life for a trophy that people may find a bit crazy if they don’t understand trophies? Share your own stories in the comments below.


I want Trophy Theory to be a conversation. This shouldn’t be me talking at you. It should be a discussion about trophies and everything that comes with it. I want your suggestions for what you want to talk about or see on Trophy Theory. Have a question for the Trophy community that you want to discuss? Throw your ideas into the comments below, email me, or tweet me. You may see your suggestion tailored into a future Trophy Theory.

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